Define conditions

From the pool of available attributes, you select an attribute and also an operator and a value. This serves as the trigger of the action. For example, you could specify that an action triggers when:

Sender ID
(attribute)

equals
(operator)

Community A
(value)

You also can set up an action that compares the value of one attribute to the value of another attribute.

For example, you can reject inbound messages when the sender ID parsed from the payload is not the same as the sender ID in the message protocol envelope. To do this, you could create an attribute named ParsedSenderId whose value is parsed from XML documents. Then you would set up an action to reject messages that meet the following two conditions. Note, the Is Receipt condition is required to make sure the action applies only to inbound messages, but not outbound receipts.

1.

ParsedSenderId
(attribute)

not equal
(operator)

Sender routing ID
(attribute)

2.

AND
Is Receipt = false

 

 

You can set up multiple conditions, all of which must be met for an action to trigger.

Operators

The following list defines the operators. Not all of these are available for all attributes.

  • Exists – The operator tests whether an attribute has any value at all.
  • Doesn't exist – The operator tests whether an attribute has no value at all.
  • Equals – The operator tests whether an attribute has a *specific* value. (Meaning that it both exists and has that specific value.)
  • Not Equal – The operator tests whether an attribute does not match a specific value, meaning that it exists but not with that specific value.
  • Starts with – The operator tests whether an attribute begins with the specified value. This can be used in wildcard searches. For example, match any string beginning with foo.
  • Ends with – The operator tests whether an attribute ends with the specified value. This can be used in wildcard searches. For example, find any string ending with foo.
  • Contains – The operator tests whether an attribute contains the specified value. This can be used in wildcard searches. For example, match any string containing foo.
Note   The operators starts with, ends with and contains are available only with these attributes: Consumption file name and Production file name.

In addition to equals and not equal, there are the following related operators whose purpose is self explanatory: greater than, less than, greater than or equal and less than or equal.

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