Modify a staged HTTP transport

The following topics document the fields on the maintenance pages for the staged HTTP web transport.

The maintenance pages display the transport fields that can be changed, while the delivery exchange wizard has only the most commonly used. The following are the fields on the settings and advanced tabs.

HTTP settings tab

  • URL – The URL for connecting to the server. If Encode and Decode buttons display, click Encode if the URL contains spaces or non-alphanumeric characters to encode the characters. Click Decode to reverse the transformation. For example, if you enter http://foo.com/foo= bar and click Encode the URL becomes http://foo.com/foo%3D%20%20bar.
  • This server requires a user name and password – If selected, type a user name and password to connect to the server.

HTTPS settings tab

  • URL – The URL for connecting to the server. If Encode and Decode buttons display, click Encode if the URL contains spaces or non-alphanumeric characters to encode the characters. Click Decode to reverse the transformation. For example, if you enter http://foo.com/foo= bar and click Encode the URL becomes http://foo.com/foo%3D%20%20bar.
  • Enable host name verification – If selected, Activator compares the name of the SSL server to the name in the server’s certificate to ensure they are the same.
  • This server requires a user name and password – If selected, type a user name and password to connect to the server.

Advanced tab

  • Maximum concurrent connections – The number of total open connections Activator can make to a partner.
  • Retries – This is the number of times Activator will retry connecting to the partner’s transport if the initial attempt to connect and send the message failed. The following are common reasons for triggering retries.
    • The connection attempt failed immediately for a reason such as host not found.
    • The host was found, but the connection process took longer than the connect timeout interval specified on the Advanced tab.
    • The connection was successful, but the partner’s HTTP server took longer than the response timeout interval to return a 200 OK response indicating the message was successfully received. A 200 OK response is a transport response, separate from a message protocol response such as an AS2 receipt.

    Note that in the last case, the 200 OK response also will include the receipt if synchronous receipts were requested. Otherwise, it will be a simple 200 OK response with no payload. And if an asynchronous receipt was requested, the partner will connect later to send it.

    Retries occur according to an algorithm that starts at 5 minutes. The interval between retries increases with each subsequent retry in this pattern: 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 60 minutes. The interval plateaus at 60 minutes. This means if the retry value is greater than 5, the fifth and each subsequent retry occurs at 60 minute intervals.

    For example, if retries is 3, the system will try connecting again in 5 minutes if the initial connection attempt fails. If this retry attempt also fails, the system attempts a second retry in 10 minutes. The third retry attempt is made 15 minutes later. If the third retry attempt fails, the message is given a failed status. So after four attempts (the first attempt plus 3 retries), the message fails. You can search for and manually resubmit failed messages in Message Tracker.

    Retries do not occur precisely at these intervals because each connection attempt takes some seconds, which varies by computer. So retries actually occur after the connection attempt time plus the interval.

    This control applies only to retrying to send messages, not receiving. It applies only to retrying to send related to transport issues. It does not apply to successfully sent messages for which receipts have not been received as expected. Another control, resends, determines how many times the system will resend a message when a receipt is not received from the partner. For information about resends, see reliable messaging in the collaboration settings chapter.

  • Connect timeout (seconds) – Time in seconds Activator waits for a connection to the delivery exchange before the attempt times out. Although the default value is 30 seconds, this may be longer than the interval allowed by your operating system (OS). For example, Windows XP by default allows a maximum timeout of 20 seconds. The actual connect timeout interval is the lesser of the OS timeout and the value set in Activator.
  • Read timeout (seconds) – Time in seconds Activator waits to read data from the delivery exchange before terminating the connection.
  • Response timeout (seconds) – The interval, in seconds, that Activator waits for the delivery exchange to respond to a request before terminating the connection.
  • Back up the files that go through this transport – Indicates whether the system backs up copies of the messages it retrieves from integration or receives from partners. Backing up files. This is required for the system to perform fail-over operations such as attempting to send messages again (retries) in case of a transport connection failure. Without backups, a message in process cannot be recovered if the server or a processing node stops or restarts. Backups are needed to resubmit messages to back-end applications or resend messages to partners. Backup files are stored in \<install directory>\common\data\backup, unless you specify otherwise.
  • Restrict maximum file size for this transport – Optionally lets you specify the maximum size of files a transport can handle.
  • If Activator receives a file larger than the maximum, the file is rejected and a message is written to the events log. If received via HTTP, a 413 response also is sent and the connection is closed. A 413 message is Request Entity Too Large.
  • The maximum size must be expressed in bytes. Do not use commas. For instance, a kilobyte is 1024 bytes, a megabyte is 1048576 bytes, a gigabyte is 1073741824 bytes.
  • The smallest maximum allowed is 1000 bytes. On the opposite extreme, you can enter the largest number the field can accommodate.
  • This control is available only for transports used for picking up messages from the back end or receiving messages from partners.
  • Maximum files per polling interval – The highest number of messages the system can retrieve each time it polls.
  • Polling interval (seconds) – The interval in seconds Activator waits before polling for messages to retrieve.
  • Specify preferred nodes – If there are one or more nodes for Activator, you can select one or more as the preferred nodes for consuming messages. If the preferred nodes are running, these are used to process messages. If the preferred nodes are stopped, work is distributed among the remaining running available nodes. Selecting preferred nodes lets you manage work distribution among nodes.
  • This option is available for application and trading pickup exchanges that poll for messages.
  • In general, this setting should not be used. Usually it is best to let Activator automatically determine which node should be responsible for initiating the polling of which exchange point. This setting is useful if you have a cluster that spans geographical locations and each location has its own local transport servers. In this situation, you would use this setting to ensure the exchange points associated with the transport servers are assigned to nodes in the vicinity of the transport servers.

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